Wallace McClure

Wallace McClure

Training at Scalable Development,

Location
Knoxville, Tennessee Area
Industry
Computer Software

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Wallace McClure's Overview

Current
Past
  • Consultant at Magnatron
  • Chief Technology Officer at Happy Mappy, Inc.
  • Lead Developer - Consultant at Bailey Manufacturing
Education
Connections

500+ connections

Wallace McClure's Summary

Software developer, business owner, and budding entrepreneur. Lover of the web, mobile devices, and databases. Currently in love with iPhone/iPad, Android, and HTML5 Development. Also, love the business side of web development, web services, and scaling .NET apps up to ridiculous numbers of users and proving the anti-.NET skeptics wrong. Before that, I loved databases like Sql Server, Oracle, and other client-server style databases. And somewhere in there, AJAX is pretty cool too.

Currently, 22 years in the business of writing software.

Specialties: iPhone, iPad, Android, HTML5, ASP.NET, Ajax, Databases, Sql, MonoTouch, MonoDroid.

Wallace McClure's Experience

Mobile Training Author - iPhone, Android, HTML5

Scalable Development,

January 2011Present (3 years 9 months)

Computer Technology Advisory Council

Pellissippi State Community College

July 2007Present (7 years 3 months) Knoxville, Tennessee Area

July 2007Present (7 years 3 months) Knoxville, TN

Basketball Coach

Volunteer

December 2003Present (10 years 10 months) Knoxville, Tennessee Area

Lead Developer for CMS and AMS

U.S. Department of Education

July 2003Present (11 years 3 months)

Developer and Consultant

Marriott Business Systems

June 2003Present (11 years 4 months)

President

Scalable Development, Inc.

September 2002Present (12 years 1 month)

Owner

Scalable Development

January 1996Present (18 years 9 months)

Consultant

Magnatron

20002009 (9 years)

Chief Technology Officer

Happy Mappy, Inc.

November 2006November 2008 (2 years 1 month) Greater Atlanta Area

Lead Developer - Consultant

Bailey Manufacturing

April 1999January 2005 (5 years 10 months)

Consultant

Bechtel National

July 2001January 2003 (1 year 7 months)

Software Architect - Lead Developer

Popular Categories

August 2000November 2002 (2 years 4 months) Knoxville, TN

Consultant

State of Tennessee

April 2000July 2001 (1 year 4 months)

Lead Developer and Consultant

Lucent Technologies

December 1998March 2000 (1 year 4 months)

January 1999August 1999 (8 months)

June 1992September 1995 (3 years 4 months)

Developer

Martin Marietta Energy Systems

March 1990September 1990 (7 months)

June 1989June 1990 (1 year 1 month)

Wallace McClure's Honors and Awards

  • Xamarin Mobile Certification

    Xamarin, Inc.
    • May 2013

    The certification test includes 100 questions spanning the Xamarin.iOS, Xamarin.Android, and Xamarin.Mobile material covered in the Evolve Fundamentals Track.

  • Xamarin MVP

    Xamarin, Inc.
    • July 2013

    Xamarin MVPs have earned recognition for significant contributions to the community, including:
    Writing great articles, books, and blog posts
    Speaking in public and online
    Helping developers online in our forums, on Twitter, Stack Overflow and other communities, and
    Shipping outstanding apps

Wallace McClure's Certifications

  • Microsoft MVP in ASP.NET

    • Microsoft
    • January 2004 to December 2013
  • ASP Insider

    • Microsoft
    • October 2003
  • Xamarin Insider

    • Xamarin, Inc.
    • April 2012
  • Xamarin MVP

    • Xamarin
    • July 2013

Wallace McClure's Skills & Expertise

  1. iPhone development
  2. Android
  3. AJAX
  4. MonoTouch
  5. Mono for Android
  6. HTML5
  7. Sql Server
  8. jQuery Mobile
  9. iPhone
  10. iPad
  11. Honeycomb
  12. Ice Cream Sandwich
  13. jQuery
  14. Android Tablet
  15. Oracle
  16. Web Services
  17. REST
  18. ASP.NET
  19. Microsoft SQL Server
  20. iOS development
  21. Mono
  22. HTML 5
  23. SQL
  24. Databases
  25. iPhone & iPad Programming
  26. C#
  27. Early-stage Startups
  28. Startup Success
  29. Project Turnarounds (Failure to Success)
  30. Consensus Building
  31. MySQL
  32. Startups
  33. Entrepreneurship
  34. Start-ups
  35. Programming
  36. Mobile Applications
  37. MonoDevelop
  38. Technical Writing
  39. Visual Studio
  40. .NET
  41. XML
  42. JavaScript
  43. IIS
  44. Web Development
  45. Objective-C
  46. Architecture
  47. ASP
  48. Visual Basic
  49. XSLT
  50. Design Patterns

View All (50) Skills View Fewer Skills

Wallace McClure's Publications

  • Building Highly Scalable Database Applications with Microsoft .NET

    • John Wiley and Sons
    • June 15, 2002

    Creating robust, highly available, highly scalable database applications is absolutely critical in today's web-based economy. Integrating various non-Microsoft database servers with Microsoft tools and technologies has not always proven to be an easy task. The new-paradigm of .NET development further complicates the issue, but also provides a powerful set of tools and technologies to build these mission-critical systems. With Building Highly Scalable database Applications with .NET, readers will be able to:
    * Integrate .NET-based solutions with Oracle and DB2 and MySQL
    * Harness the power of Microsoft's ADO.Net for high performance computing
    * Build efficient components for maximum scalability
    * Integrate with existing COM-based applications
    * Maximize transaction speed and message queue efficiency
    * Scale applications to a much higher level, resulting in an increase in the number of users or transactions

    As the lead author of this book, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the book to the publisher.
    * Performing market analysis for this book.
    * Recruiting co-authors.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the book.
    * Editing the book.
    * Marketing the book.

  • Professional ADO.NET 2: Programming with Sql Server 2005, Oracle, and MySql,

    • Wrox Publishing
    • December 5, 2003

    ADO.NET revolutionized the way data was accessed through SQL Server, Oracle, and MySQL. With Microsoft's release of ADO.NET 2, ADO and the .NET Framework are integrated with SQL Server for the first time-enabling you to program .NET applications directly within the SQL Server database.
    Packed with sample code and recommended best practices for using ADO.NET 2, this code-intensive book explores the new data types that are available in the 2.0 Framework and discusses the appropriate time and way to use them. You'll learn how to make repetitive, mundane tasks much simpler and you'll walk away with a solid foundation for developing database-driven applications.

    As the lead author of this book, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the book to the publisher.
    * Performing market analysis for this book.
    * Recruiting co-authors.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the book.
    * Editing the book.
    * Marketing the book.

  • Beginning AJAX with ASP.NET

    • Wrox
    • September 5, 2006

    Ajax has the power to revolutionize the way web-based applications are designed. This book provides you with a thorough working knowledge of what Ajax has to offer and how to take full advantage of it in your application development.


    Following an exploration of how Ajax works with .NET, you'll get acquainted with DHTML, the role of JavaScript and the Document Object Model, and the XMLHttpRequest Object, which is the
    foundation of Ajax. Then you will examine the Ajax-type features built into ASP.NET and explore the Ajax.NET Professional Library in detail. Finally, you will explore client scripting as well as building and using controls with Microsoft's Atlas. With an entire chapter devoted to debugging, you will have all you need to use this cutting-edge technology.

    As the lead author of this book, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the book to the publisher.
    * Performing market analysis for this book.
    * Recruiting co-authors.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the book.
    * Editing the book.
    * Marketing the book.

  • Beginning ASP.NET 2.0 AJAX

    • Wrox
    • July 10, 2007

    With this comprehensive introduction to ASP.NET 2.0 AJAX framework technologies, you'll quickly learn how to build richer, more dynamic web sites and web applications. It provides you with an in-depth understanding of ASP.NET 2.0 AJAX and clearly shows you how to apply the framework. You'll also find numerous code examples throughout the chapters that you'll be able to utilize as you begin creating your applications.
    Written by a team of Microsoft MVPs, this book will get you up to speed on how to program the ASP.NET 2.0 AJAX framework on the ASP.NET platform. After delving into the framework, it demonstrates how to perform basic AJAX-style operations with web services, using the UpdatePanel, the AJAX Control Toolkit, and other features. You'll then progress to more advanced aspects of the framework, including security, integration with the ASP.NET services, and debugging.

    As the lead author of this book, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the book to the publisher.
    * Performing market analysis for this book.
    * Recruiting co-authors.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the book.
    * Editing the book.
    * Marketing the book.

  • New Features in ASP.NET 3.5 Service Pack 1

    • Wrox
    • December 1, 2008

    There are several new features that are included with ASP.NET 3.5 Service Pack 1. This Wrox Blox reviews these new features. These include Support History and the Back Button with ASP.NET AJAX, making your AJAX pages faster through script combining, and the ability to easily create web pages that users can perform basic CRUD operations with named Dynamic Data. In addition, this Wrox Blox covers routing with Web Forms—Routing is a part of ASP.NET MVC that should be out in 2009. (It is not exclusively the domain of MVC.) Service Pack 1 includes support for routing. In addition, this Wrox Blox covers jQuery—While not technically a part of Service Pack 1, Microsoft released support for jQuery within ASP.NET at the same approximate time as Service Pack 1.

    As the author of this book, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the book to the publisher.
    * Performing market analysis for this book.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the book.
    * Editing the book.
    * Marketing the book.

  • Building iPhone and iPod touch Applications for the .NET/C# Developer with MonoTouch

    • Wrox
    • November 30, 2009

    This Wrox Blox is for .NET developers who want to learn to develop for the iPhone with C# using MonoTouch and MonoDevelop on the Mac. The iPhone is the smartphone leader in mindshare and the amount of money spent on applications. This lead in money spent on applications is expected to grow over the next several years. Objective-C is the native language for iPhone development. .NET developers, who work in the largest general area of development frameworks, have looked at iPhone developers with a great deal of envy. But with the release of MonoTouch, .NET/C# developers can apply their knowledge to iPhone development. This Wrox Blox will provide you with the basics of development on the iPhone with MonoTouch and MonoDevelop.

    As the lead author of this book, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the book to the publisher.
    * Performing market analysis for this book.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the book.
    * Editing the book.
    * Marketing the book.

  • Professional iPhone Programming with MonoTouch and .NET/C#

    • Wrox
    • July 13, 2010

    What .NET C# developers need to enter the hot field of iPhone apps
    iPhone applications offer a hot opportunity for developers. Until the open source MonoTouch project, this field was limited to those familiar with Apple’s programming languages. Now .NET and C# developers can join the party. Professional iPhone Programming with MonoTouch and .NET/C#is the first book to cover MonoTouch, preparing developers to take advantage of this lucrative opportunity.

    This book is for .NET developers that are interested in creating native iPhone applications written in .NET/C#. These developers want to use their existing knowledge. While .NET developers are always interested in learning, they also recognize that learning Objective-C and the specifics of the iPhone can be overwhelming. Those developers interested in MonoTouch will recognize that the cost of MonoTouch is easily made up by the ability to quickly target the iPhone using a language that they are already familiar with.

    This book is designed for .NET developers that want to target the iPhone. It is designed to help you get up to speed with the iPhone, not to really teach you about the .NET Framework or C# language, which we assume you already know.

    As the lead author of this book, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the book to the publisher.
    * Performing market analysis for this book.
    * Recruiting co-authors.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the book.
    * Editing the book.
    * Marketing the book.

  • Professional Android Programming with Mono for Android and .NET/C#

    • Wrox
    • March 19, 2012

    The wait is over! For the millions of .NET/C# developers who have been eagerly awaiting the book that will guide them through the white-hot field of Android application programming, this is the book. As the first guide to focus on Mono for Android, this must-have resource dives into writing applications against Mono with C# and compiling executables that run on the Android family of devices.

    Putting the proven Wrox Professional format into practice, the authors provide you with the knowledge you need to become a successful Android application developer without having to learn another programming language. You'll explore screen controls, UI development, tables and layouts, and MonoDevelop as you become adept at developing Android applications with Mono for Android.

    Answers the demand for a detailed book on the extraordinarily popular field of Android application development
    Strengthens your existing skills of writing applications and shows you how to transfer your talents to building Android apps with Mono for Android and .NET/C#
    Dives into working with data, REST, SOAP, XML, and JSON
    Discusses how to communicate with other applications, deploy apps, and even make money in the process
    Professional Android Programming with Mono for Android and .NET/C# gets you up and running with Android app development today.

    As the lead author of this book, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the book to the publisher.
    * Performing market analysis for this book.
    * Recruiting co-authors.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the book.
    * Editing the book.
    * Marketing the book.

  • Guide to Building iOS (iPhone and iPad) Applications with Monotouch

    • DevProConnections
    • March 23, 2011

    In 2009, Novell announced a version of its Mono .NET-compatible open source development platform that's designed to run within the iPhone as a native application. This version of Mono, named MonoTouch, generated significant excitement within the .NET community. MonoTouch lets .NET developers take a portion of their existing development knowledge and use that to build applications that run on the iPhone. Although you can't take an existing .NET application and run that application on the iPhone, developers can apply their knowledge to building iPhone applications. I liken this to you, as an American, going to England and speaking the British dialect. You know the same basic language; but the accents, mannerisms, and certain terms are different.

    As the author of this article, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the article to the publisher.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the article.
    * Editing the article.
    * Marketing the article.

  • MonoDroid(Mono for Android) Tutorial Part 1: Introduction to MonoDroid

    • Visual Studio Magazine
    • February 1, 2011

    In the first part of this tutorial series, Wallace McClure walks you through what MonoDroid (Mono for Android) is and how .NET developers can use it to create Android apps.

    As the author of this article, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the article to the publisher.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the article.
    * Editing the article.
    * Marketing the article.

  • I'm Hooked on the Cloud

    • DevProConnections
    • April 22, 2011

    This is a guest editorial on why I am excited about Windows Azure and Cloud Computing.

  • HTML5 for ASP.NET Developers

    • DevProConnections
    • August 22, 2011

    HTML standards have been an important part of web development since the beginning of the web. HTML5, the most recent version of HTML, is a work in progress. After several attempts, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) formally began work on an update to the HTML specifications. (See "The Past, Present, and Future of HTML5" for detail about the history of HTML5.) This work first bore fruit with the publication of a public draft of HTML5 standards in January 2008. Hopefully, the final specifications will occur over the next several years, but the lack of formal specifications doesn't mean that we as developers can't take advantage of the HTML5 features that browser companies have already incorporated into their products.

    As the author of this article, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the article to the publisher.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the article.
    * Editing the article.
    * Marketing the article.

  • Mobile HTML5 for ASP.NET Developers

    • DevProConnections / Penton Media
    • October 26, 2011

    Building native applications can be costly and time consuming. How can companies effectively target mobile platforms with the same codebase and save development dollars? ASP.NET is a very common development platform. In this hour-long Web seminar, we will look at how we can use ASP.NET to target mobile platforms. The benefits of this approach are:
    Easy cross-platform development.
    No requirement to learn Objective-C/XCode or Java/Eclipse.
    Applications are immediately upgradeable. There is no requirement to go through the marketplace and app store of either platform.
    Web developers are easier to find than Objective-C or Java developers.


    Come to this Web seminar to learn:
    What are the features of HTML5?
    How can ASP.NET Developers use their existing knowledge to take advantage of HTML5/Mobile Development.
    jQuery Mobile, and learn how to leverage it to build applications that target mobile applications.

    As the author of this article, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the article to the publisher.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the seminar.
    * Editing the seminar.
    * Marketing the seminar.

  • Introduction to iPhone Programming with Monotouch

    • AppDev
    • September 1, 2011

    The iPhone and the OS of the iPhone, iOS, have set a standard for all smart phones for usability. As iPhone became more powerful it made since to advantage of that power and create applications for the iPhone that allow employees or customers to use company systems to the companies’ benefit. This course introduces the MonoTouch, a program add-on for Xcode that is used to create applications for the iPhone and iOS using C# and the .NET framework and not in the native Object C language of iOS, thus making it easier for C# programmers to create iPhone applications. This course will start off with an introduction to the iPhone, Xcode and MonoTouch. Then move on to application events, screen controls and tabular data. iPhone mapping and location services as well as integrating with other applications via URLs are discussed.

    In this course, you will learn:

    About the Layers and SDK of iOS
    What are the Cocoa Touch Framework
    How to Debug the Applications in iOS
    The Basic Life Cycle of an iOS Application
    About Control Events Based on a User Action
    About the Types of UI Controls
    What the 4 Standard Data Tables Are
    About the Map Properties of the iOS

    As the author of this seminar, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the seminar to the publisher.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the seminar.
    * Marketing the seminar.

  • Android Programming with Mono for Android

    • AppDev
    • September 1, 2011

    The smart phone is quickly becoming a necessary tool for employees and customers alike. It has become necessary for highly mobile businesses to adopt this new technology. This course will show how to create applications for the Android OS, found on both smart phones and tablets, using Mono for Android. Mono for Android is an add-on for Visual Studio 2010 using C# and the.NET framework to build applications for the Android OS instead of coding in the native Java code. The course will start with an introduction to the Android OS and platforms then do an introduction to the MONO development environment. Then move onto basic UI design, screen controls and SQLite. The course follows up with the subjects of remote data, location services and Geocoding.

    In this course, you will learn:

    About MonoDroid for the Mac
    Debugging strategies with Mono for Android
    How to take advantage of tablets from a UI perspective
    About basic user interface controls
    About SQLite
    How to use configure remote data with XML and other services
    About Geocoding and Reverse Geocoding

    As the author of this article, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the seminar.
    * Marketing the article to the seminar.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the seminar.
    * Marketing the seminar.

  • Building an Android User Interface with Mono for Android

    • Visual Studio Magazine - 1105 Media
    • November 1, 2011

    There's no doubt about it: Smartphones based on the Android OS are hot. Currently, they're generating 550,000 activations per day. Their market share is at approximately 40 percent, and continuing to rise.

    That success wouldn't be happening without a friendly, clean UI. Many times, a user will base their feelings about an application on the UI. In this article, I'll look at the XML layout language for Android, some controls that can be used in Android and the tools that can be used to create a UI -- namely, Mono for Android, which enables you to create native apps in C# and Visual Studio using an open source implementation of the Microsoft .NET Framework. Then I'll talk about how choices can factor in with some of the constraints, such as the battery.


    As the author of this article, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the article to the publisher.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the article.
    * Editing the article.
    * Marketing the article.

  • Introduction to Mono for Android

    • BZ Media -Andevcon
    • November 5, 2011

    A full day class on android programming with mono for android.

  • MonoTouch Tutorial: Display Tabular Data in iPhone and iPad Applications

    • DevProConnections Magazine
    • January 11, 2012

    Data is what makes applications go. It could be a Twitter search, a running game score where you are playing against your friends, sales data, or any other type of data that users want to base decisions on. In this article, we're going to look at presenting tabular data to users in a UITableView. The UITableView has a number of visually attractive default styles that you can use. After we're done looking at these, we'll look at creating a custom UITableView layout. Along the journey, we'll look at some optimizations we can do that will give the user an improved experience. After we're done with this, we'll look at some strategies to get at various data sources, such as Representational State Transfer (REST), Windows Communication Foundation (WCF), SQL Server, and the on-board SQLite database.

    As the author of this article, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the article to the publisher.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the article.
    * Editing the article.
    * Marketing the article.

  • Building Mapping and Location Services into your MonoTouch Application

    • Dev Pro Connections
    • January 16, 2012

    Mobile phones are by definition, mobile. A couple of interesting questions that come up when users are mobile are, "What's around me for dinner?" and "Where can I get gasoline?" If you are a retailer or a company, you want to tell potential customers that there is a retail location near them. If you are a user, you might also be interested in learning about how to go from where you are to a specific address. In this article we'll look at these and associated features, so that we can provide them to users via mapping and location services to users in iOS apps.


    As the author of this article, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the article to the publisher.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the article.
    * Editing the article.
    * Marketing the article.

  • Introduction to HTML5 for Mobile Development

    • Dev Pro Connections Magazine
    • January 24, 2012

    HTML5 is the umbrella term for the next major evolution of markup, JavaScript, and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) for web applications. HTML5 is becoming an ever-more important mobile development technology -- especially in light of Adobe's recent announcement that it's ceasing development on Flash Player for mobile browsers and increasing its investments in HTML5. To bring you up to speed on this crucial aspect of development, DevProConnections has covered HTML5 extensively in recent months, including my article "HTML5 for the ASP.NET Developer." In this article, I intend to provide a similarly comprehensive overview of HTML5 with an emphasis on features oriented toward mobile development. We'll dive into some specific examples of HTML5 features and focus specifically on what is available with mobile devices. I will focus on what developers can do today as opposed to what is part of the specific set of standards. I'll also mention where a product may have a slightly different outcome than expected.

  • What you can do with HTML5 Today!

    • Dev Pro Connections
    • February 22, 2012

    HTML5 is the direction for web-based applications. All you have to do is listen to the material from any technical conference or keep an eye on web developer online community discussions to know that HTML5 is important. Each day, I read about new and exciting HTML5 features and uses for those features -- witness the many new features in the latest versions of Internet Explorer (IE), Chrome, and Firefox.

  • Building a User Interface with Mono for Android (webinar)

    • AppDev
    • March 5, 2012

    We will look at the basics of building a user interface for Android with Mono for Android. The user interface is typically the first thing that a user sees when they work with your application. They will often judge your application based on the user interface. We will examine the basic concepts of UI design with mobile devices, the Android XML based layout language, some of the UI design surfaces for Android, some basic Android controls and finally some suggestions on creating a successful Android User Interface.

  • Android Development with Mono for Android 4

    • AppDev
    • February 15, 2012

    This course will show you how to use Mono for Android 4 by starting with how to install Mono for Android 4, introduce the SDK tools and then debugging of applications. The course then will show how to use the Emulators for items like interface design and controls. Next are the different types of Android devices and how to support them. Application Activities and lifecycles are covered and then Menus, Tables and Data. The course will then show the soft keyboards, advanced controls, user notifications and working with the contacts lists. The course will conclude with working with device hardware for directions, multimedia and Geo location.

    As the author of this seminar, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the article to the publisher.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the article.
    * Marketing the seminar.

  • Wrox Cross Platform Android and iOS Mobile Development Three-Pack

    • Jon Wiley and Sons
    • March 16, 2012

    A bundle of 3 best-selling and respected mobile development e-books from Wrox form a complete library on the key tools and techniques for developing apps across the hottest platforms including Android and iOS. This collection includes the full content of these three books, at a special price:
    Professional Android Programming with Mono for Android and .NET/C#, ISBN: 9781118026434, by Wallace B. McClure, Nathan Blevins, John J. Croft, IV, Jonathan Dick, and Chris Hardy
    Professional iPhone Programming with MonoTouch and .NET/C#, ISBN: 9780470637821, by Wallace B. McClure, Rory Blyth, Craig Dunn, Chris Hardy, and Martin Bowling
    Professional Cross-Platform Mobile Development in C#, ISBN: 9781118157701, by Scott Olson, John Hunter, Ben Horgen, and Kenny Goers

    As the coauthor of these books, I was responsible for:
    * Preparing the idea for the publisher.
    * Marketing the concept to the publisher.
    * Writing code samples.
    * Writing content for the books.
    * Editing the books.
    * Marketing the books.

  • Working with Images and Animation on the iPhone and iPad with .NET and C#: Part 1

    • DevProConnections

    Multimedia has come a long way during my career in programming. I remember the HP-41C, the first calculator that I used day to day in my geeky teenage years (unfortunately, I've only gotten geekier as I have gotten older). It could only output text and a few beeps. I was in nirvana and thought it just couldn't get any better. Now, everyone in my family has an iPhone and an iPad. With these devices, we can use software and hardware to record and play audio and video, take and display pictures, and modify this content.

  • Better Debugging with Mono for Android

    • Visual Studio Magazine
    • April 25, 2012

    Let's be honest: When debugging with Android -- and Mono for Android (MfA) on Windows by extension -- using the emulator requires patience. This isn't a condemnation of Mono for Android; merely recognition of the reality of having to live within the Android ecosystem. I've noticed that most developers who develop on Android tend to be using a Mac. I think this is due to the development experience on the Mac being better overall for Android.

    Let's look at how this debugging has improved recently for Windows developers targeting Android with C#.

  • Working with Images and Animation on the iPhone and iPad with .NET and C#: Part 2

    • Dev Pro Connections - Penton Media
    • May 1, 2012

    This article resumes where we left off in "Working with Images and Animation on the iPhone and iPad with .NET and C#: Part 1," which looked at multimedia app development on the iPhone and iPad, including how to display simple images, take pictures with the device's camera, and perform some simple animation with the images. In this article, part 2, we'll look at how to perform more complicated animation using the NSTimer and UIView classes, how to display and record video, and how to edit the video.

  • Lights, Camera, Action with Mono for Android - Multimedia in Android

    • Visual Studio Maganazine - 1105 Media
    • May 1, 2012

    Multimedia is expected in today's mobile applications, and the fun isn't only for smartphone and tablet users. Mono for Android, based on the Mono project's open source implementation of the Microsoft .NET Framework, can help you take advantage of Android Camera APIs in Visual Studio.

    I don't know about you, but I'm amazed at what you can do with the multimedia in today's mobile devices. I grew up playing "Pong" and remember when games had to fit into big boxes with green screens and ASCII art. About 10 years ago, I had to create an interpreter for the graphics processor in the IBM AS/400 systems (iSeries now) to generate graphics in a screen-scraping application. How did we survive those days?

    Now, mobile devices allow you to take pictures, record audio and video, and send it all to friends and relatives in minutes. You're seeing this happen all over the world, even in uprisings, as people compete to get their stories out.

  • Mobile Web Development Featuring jQuery Mobile

    • Penton Media
    • May 17, 2012

    Mobile development is a hot item. Customers are buying iPhones, iPads, Android devices, and many other mobile computing devices at an ever increasing record pace. Devices based on iOS and Android are nearly 80 percent of the marketplace. RIM continues to be dominant in the business area across the world. Nokia's growth with Windows Phone will grow on a worldwide basis. At the same time, clearly web development is a tremendous driver of applications, both on the public Internet and on private networks. How can developers target these various mobile platforms with web technologies? Developers can write web applications that take advantage of each mobile platform, but that is a lot of work. Into this space, the jQuery Mobile framework was developed. This eLearning series will provide an overview of mobile web development with jQuery Mobile, a detailed look at what the jQuery Mobile framework provides for us, how we can customize jQuery Mobile, and how we can use jQuery Mobile inside of ASP.NET.

  • Android Advanced Development Using Mono for Android 4

    • AppDev / LearnNow, LLC
    • April 25, 2012

    This course is about how to use Mono for Android with Tablets and the new Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich release. The course introduces Android Tablets and Fragments, new controls that are available through Android 4.0, new application programming interfaces in Android 4.0, and new features available in the Google Android SDK Release 17 that can improve their development experience. This course also contains a module on the Android Design Experience, what developers can use to improve the user experiences, design suggestions from Google’s Android team, and some thoughts on how to improve the design experience via software code.

  • Cross Platform Mobile Development with Mono for Android and MonoTouch

    • Visual Studio Magazine
    • May 30, 2012

    Many years ago, in fact pre-Java, I remember a hallway discussion about the desire to write a single application that could easily run across various platforms. At the time, we were only worried about writing applications on Windows 3.1 and Mac OS 7.x. There were many discussions about windows, user interface concepts, and specifically a rather long discussion as to whether Mac users would accept a Mac application that didn't have balloon help. Thankfully, the marketplace answered this question for us with the Windows API winning the battle.

    A similar set of questions is currently going on in the mobile world. Unfortunately, at this point in time, there is currently no winning API and none currently in sight. What's a developer to do? Here are some questions that developers have (and there are many more):

    How can mobile developers target Android and the iPhone with the same code?
    How can .NET developers share their code across Android, iPhone and other platforms?
    How can developers give applications the look and feel of the specific platform and still allow as much code as possible to be shared?
    Mobile devices share many common features, such as cameras, accelerometers, and address books. How can we take advantage of them in a platform independent way and still give the users the look of every other application running on their platform?

    In this article, we'll look at some solutions to these cross-platform and code-sharing questions between Mono for Android, MonoTouch and the .NET Framework available to developers.

  • Xamarin Designer for Android

    • AppDev
    • May 23, 2012

    Android user interfaces can be created declaratively by using XML files, or programmatically in code. The Xamarin Android Designer allows developers to create and modify declarative layouts visually, without having to deal with the tedium of hand-editing XML files. The designer also provides real-time feedback, which lets the developer validate changes without having to redeploy the application in order to test a design. This can speed up UI development in Android tremendously. In this webinar, we'll take a look at UI Design in Mono for Android, the basics of the Xamarin Android Designer, and build a simple application with the designer.

  • Introducing the Xamarin Designer for Android

    • Visual Studio Magazine / 1105 Media
    • June 26, 2012

    It's interesting to look at the needs of various segments of developers. When I first start looking at an environment, the first thing I need to understand is the UI. I'm not magically born with some knowledge about the environment and don't learn well by just reading, so I need some help in getting started. I found this was true when I started Windows based development in the early 1990s, Dynamic Web in the late 1990s, ASP.NET in 2000, Silverlight/WPF, iPhone and Android.

    I find that getting up to speed with a UI is the single biggest deterrent for someone learning a platform. I find that as a beginner I need the features provided by a design surface. It's only as I grow and become comfortable with a platform that I find that building a UI by hand is more productive. Even as I get more advanced, I still can learn from a designer, so it has value as I grow into a platform.

  • The Xamarin Designer for Android

    • AppDev, Inc
    • August 13, 2012

    My video series at AppDev has been updated with a new series on the Xamarin Designer for Android. Mono for Android by Xamarin has become an excellent development platform for creating applications for the Android OS. The release of Mono for Android 4.2 has introduced some new features. This course will highlight the new features in the Xamarin Designer for Android. Items covered include:
    ◦Mono for Android Status
    ◦Market Status
    ◦Designer
    ◦Visual Studio

    ◦MonoDevelop
    ◦Designer Features
    ◦Zoom Controls
    ◦Toolbox
    ◦Property Pad
    ◦Outline View
    ◦Resource Qualifiers
    ◦Resource Editing
    ◦Designer Advantages

  • What's new in Mono for Android 4.2 - Java Binding Library Project & API Level 15

    • AppDev, Inc.
    • August 13, 2012

    •Mono for Android by Xamarin has become an excellent development platform for creating applications for the Android OS. The release of Mono for Android 4.2 has introduced some new features. This course will cover the Android Java binding library project with use of .NET, library customization and bindings, and API Level 15.

  • Build an iPad Application Using MonoTouch, C#, and .NET

    • Dev Pro Connections Magazine
    • August 31, 2012

    Since its release in March 2010, the iPad has taken the world by storm. Each new iPad release has launched the device further and further into our lives. Here are some interesting facts that we have seen over the past few years along with some market share analysis:

    The school that my teenagers attend here in Knoxville, Tennessee, was the first school in the United States to integrate the iPad into its teaching program and its curriculum. Many schools have since followed suit.
    There are a healthy number of applications in a variety of market segments. In fact, there is a market for iPad point-of-sale systems.
    The iPad is a popular device and growing more so each day. comScore states that one in four smartphone owners also owns a tablet. We also know that the iPad comprises 68 percent of the tablet market.
    eMarketer recently issued a report stating that the number of iPad users is expected to grow by 90 percent in the US in 2012.

    No matter how you slice the data, tablet usage is growing, and the iPad is currently leading the pack. The question for .NET developers is "How can I get me some of that?" Xamarin's MonoTouch offers help, by providing the means for .NET developers to leverage their C# and .NET coding skills to develop iPad applications. MonoTouch has supported the iPad since the initial release of the iOS 3.2 beta SDK all the way up to the most recent iOS SDK, which supports the iPad. In this article, we'll look at targeting the iPad and how we can take advantage of iPad-specific features in our iOS applications written with MonoTouch.

    I hope you enjoy the article and you find it helpful.

  • Databinding with the ListView in Mono for Android

    • Visual Studio Magazine
    • September 14, 2012

    The world lives on data. Data is all around us and in many forms: salespeople need to know what customers have spent; twitter users want to know what their friends are saying. How do we as developers present data to a user? In Android, we use the ListView in its various forms. In this article, we'll look at using a ListView, how we can work with it, then discuss what we need to do to overcome some of the challenges in a mobile environment.

    The Mobile Environment
    Let's think for a moment about the world of mobile. Mobile, by definition, means that an application is going to have to communicate over some type of wireless connection. Wireless networks, whether it's a wi-fi connection backed up by a dedicated high-speed connection or an edge, 3G or 4G connection provided by a major cell provider, all increase the time required for data to be sent and to arrive; thus, a request takes longer. Just by being mobile, any connection will take longer than sitting in your office with several megabits per second plugged directly into a 1 gigabit connection.

    With an awareness of the particular challenges of mobile, let's think through a request for data, such as Twitter. You first make an HTTP Web request. That request gets routed to the Twitter API; the request is processed; some data is returned; the data is processed in the device; and, finally, it's displayed on the screen. Even on a good day, that request can take some time.

    How can developers resolve this issue? What happens if there's some type of hiccup in the network connection during the request? Should the application just quit working? Thankfully, Mono for Android supports threading, asynchronous operations, .NET tasks, and all the C#/.NET Framework features that developers are used to. We can use these features to make a remote request and be a good citizen on the device so that our application doesn't incur the ire of the watchdog timer.

  • Location, Orientation, and a Custom Control Compass in Mono for Android

    • http://visualstudiomagazine.com/articles/2012/10/18/location-mono-for-android.aspx
    • October 18, 2012

    Like real estate, mobile is about location, location, location. That means that direction is an important item. And just as important is how this information is presented to the user. In Nov. 2011, we talked about building a user interface in Mono For Android. In this article, I'll expand a little bit on that by creating a compass that displays north. We'll use Android's built-in sensor support to determine the orientation of the device, then use a custom control to display North.

  • Introduction to jQuery Mobile

    • MSDN Magazine
    • October 25, 2012

    There’s no doubt about it. Wherever developers look and whoever they talk to, mobile is at the top of the list. Talk to a C-level executive, and the conversation turns to mobile, and the question “How do I get me some of that?” comes up. Talk to other developers, and they tell you they’re targeting mobile devices. Mobile has become a big deal as smartphones have taken hold in the consumer marketplace.

    In the years leading up to the current focus on mobile applications and devices, Web developers have been adding more and more client-side functionality to their applications. You can see this in the use of client-side JavaScript libraries like jQuery.

    With the growth of the market for mobile devices, the ability to create applications that run across platforms is very important for developers and for businesses that are trying to keep their expenses in check. There are a set of applications, mostly in the area of content consumption (think Amazon.com), that run well in a mobile Web browser. Unfortunately, there are differences between Web browsers on various mobile devices. The goal of the recently introduced jQuery Mobile (jQM) library is to provide cross-browser support to allow developers to build applications that can run across the various mobile Web browsers and provide the same—or at least a very similar—user interface.

    This article will introduce you to jQuery Mobile.

  • Android 4 and Fragments

    • Visual Studio Magazine
    • December 13, 2012

    With the release of Android 3.0, Google added support for larger displays and attention-grabbing UI designs and layouts. On a tablet screen, UI components can be used to present better information. How does Android do this? It has a technology called Fragments, and I'll look at its implementation in the currently shipping operating system, Android 4. (Let's get past all the jokes about Android and fragmentation on its device platform.)

  • Databases and Relational Data in iPhone and Android

    • Learn Now Online (aka AppDev)
    • December 19, 2012

    Learn Now Online (formerly AppDev) has just released a section of one of my recent training series about relational databases with MonoTouch and Mono for Android. I hope you find it helpful and enjoying!

  • Xamarin Tools: Mobile Platforms

    • Learn Now Online
    • January 3, 2013

    In this course, we will take a quick look at Monocross. With Monocross, we can have a device container, such as an iPhone or Android container. Outside of that device container, we have device independent code that we can use. Then we’ll look how to use MonoTouch and Mono for Android to build applications that run on handsets as well as tablets. For iOS, this means that we can use a Universal application to build an app that runs on the iPhone as well as iPad. For Android, this means that we can build one application that can run on handsets and tablets. To end the course we’ll look at a few pitfalls that developers need to be aware of when building applications using MonoTouch and Mono for Android.

  • Xamarin Tools: Mobile and Web Services

    • Learn Now Online
    • January 3, 2013

    In this course, we will look at the Xamarin Mobile API. Mobile devices tend to have features that are functionally the same except for the APIs. For example, there is a geolocation api. The geolocation api is functionally the same across iOS and Android, yet the APIs are very different. Then we’ll look at various other services that can be commonly used in the mobile world with iPhone and Android. We can use the same API to call out to web services to get data. When that data comes back, we can use the same API in JSON and XML to process returned data in the iPhone and Android.

  • Xamarin Tools: Cross Platform Solutions and File Linking

    • Learn Now Online
    • January 3, 2013

    In this training course, we will look at the background on mobile, what is happening in the marketplace, why cross platform development makes sense, and some general strategies for cross platform development with iOS, Android, and Windows. These platforms all have one thing in common; the platforms can all be targeted with the C# language. Next we will examine file linking, general abstraction, the observer pattern, partial classes, and conditional compilation. In file linking, we can use cross platform language features, such as calling web services, LINQ, XML, and JSON to handle the communication with a remote data source on both android and iPhone.

  • Beating the Fragmentation Monster

    • Visual Studio Magazine
    • January 8, 2013

    Much has been made about fragmentation of the Android platform. The truth is that the Android platform is not as fragmented as developers think. Google provides a set of libraries that allow older versions of Android to get support for newer APIs. In this article, I'll create a version of the Star Trek navigation application (from my previous column) that runs on Android 2.x to 4.x for handsets and tablets.

  • Building iPhone, iPad, and Android Applications with .NET & C# - Interview on the Tablet Show

    • The Tablet Show
    • January 14, 2013

    Carl and Richard talk to Wally McClure about building mobile applications for iPhone and Android using MonoTouch and Mono for Android (respectively). The conversation starts out with Wally's original interest in the Mono tools, being able to leverage his code and skills in C# for mobile development. From there Wally drills into the challenges of tooling across platforms (testing frameworks, etc) as well as dealing with fragmentation of operating systems and SDKs - a bigger issue in Android than iOS, but still an issue.

  • A Deeper Dive into jQuery Mobile

    • MSDN Magazine
    • January 8, 2013

    There’s no doubt that mobile Web applications are here to stay. As I said at the start of the previous article in this series, talk to any C-level executive at a major company or any technology startup, and they’ll tell you about mobile apps.

    jQuery Mobile (jQM) provides a JavaScript framework that allows developers to easily add a mobile look and feel to their Web applications. In this article I’ll dig into some advanced features of jQuery Mobile that—with some programming—a developer can use to provide an application that looks and feels very similar to a native app running on a device. Here’s what I’ll cover:

    $.mobile. You’ll learn what the $.mobile object is, how to use it and how to set values globally in an application.
    ListView. We previously looked at the ListView at a high level. In this article I’ll describe more advanced features of the ListView that developers can use to provide the mobile equivalent of the iOS UITableView and the Android Listview.
    Navbar. Native applications typically have a navbar that provides navigation for an application. I’ll go into the more advanced concepts of the navbar, which let you provide users with a consistent navigation experience across an application.

  • Building a Custom Theme for jQuery Mobile - Making Web Sites Look Like Apps

    • MSDN Magazine
    • January 18, 2013

    The first article (Introduction to jQuery Mobile) in this series looked at the subject of themes at a high level and at themes available in jQuery Mobile (jQM). In this, the third of three articles on jQM, I show how to build a custom theme using the Theme Roller, as well as look at some custom themes that allow a mobile Web application to look more like an iPhone, Android or Windows Phone application.

  • Introduction to iOS6 for C# & .NET Developers

    • LearnNowOnline (formerly AppDev)
    • January 23, 2013

    This is a recording of my iOS6 with MonoTouch Webinar: (I think this only loads in IE)

    iOS6 is the latest version of the iOS operating system for the iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. With this new version of iOS comes the iPhone 5. In this Live Learning, we’ll discuss how to support the new iPhone 5’s display, support for social networks in iOS, and the new pull to refresh functionality in iOS6.

  • Introduction to iOS6 - Social Media & Maps

    • LearnNowOnline (formerly AppDev)
    • January 28, 2013

    Course Description: This course takes a look at the iOS6 operating system and creating applications with MonoTouch. The course will start with an introduction to iOS 6 how it has grown, software support, how to support the older iOS systems plus other items. Next the course will dive into social web sites like Twitter and Facebook and incorporating updates into an application. Then the course will look into existing maps and the new maps API.

  • Introduction to iOS6 - Social Media Improvements

    • LearnNowOnline (formerly AppDev)
    • January 31, 2013

    Take a look at the iOS6 operating system & creating apps with MonoTouch in the latest MonoTouch tutorial video http://ow.ly/hj1kr

  • New iOS6 UI Controls - UIRefresh and UICollectionView

    • Learn Now Online (formerly AppDev)
    • February 4, 2013

    Course Description: The User Interface (UI) has become a very important part of any application. This course will cover application UI in iOS 6. You will see the UI refresh control and how to have the UI refresh in an application. Then you will look at UI collection view and how work with data, cells and other items. Then the course will cover layout and display. You will see section inset, sub classing layouts and how to create linear and circular layouts.

  • iOS6 and MonoTouch: Passkit & Event Reminders

    • Learn Now Online
    • February 11, 2013

    Course Description: So what is a PassKit, this course will introduce you to the PassKit , the types there are, the file structure, security and other items. Next you‘ll be shown how to create a PassKit manually with such things as provisioning, KeyChain access and other items. Then you will learn about coding for a Pass, including complain applications, classes, list of passes to name a few items that will be covered. Next you will learn about reminders and events. You’ll see the EventStore, Enumerate Calendars, create an event, and create a reminder, running a query plus more.


    1+ hours of media runtime

    PassKit Intro

    PassKit Agenda
    What is PassKit
    PassKit Ecosystem
    What is a Pass
    Types of Passes
    File Structure
    Pass.json File
    Barcodes
    Relevancy
    Localization
    Security
    Passbook
    Getting Passes into Passbook

    Manually Create a PassKit

    Create a Pass Manually
    Provisioning
    Created
    Certificate Signing Request
    KeyChain Access
    Certificate Request
    Pass Certificate Created
    Download
    Build the Signpass Utility
    Must Update
    Run the Signpass Utility
    Manifest.json Output
    End Result
    Resources

    Coding

    Companion Applications
    Passes and MonoDevelop
    Classes
    Check Passbook Availability
    Pass Library Instance
    List of Passes
    Displaying a Pass
    Loading a Pass From a File
    Replace an Existing Pass
    Editing a Pass
    Receiving Change Notifications
    Resource
    Demo: Passes
    Demo: Pass Code

    Reminders and EventKit

    Agenda
    EventStore
    Accessibility
    Requesting Access
    Objects
    Enumerate Calendars
    Add or Modify an Event
    Create an Event
    Create a Reminder
    Retrieve an Event
    Retrieve a Reminder
    Deleting an Event
    Search for Events
    Search for Reminders
    Demo: EventKit
    Demo: Reminders
    Demo: Running a Query
    Resources

  • Professional Android Programming with Mono for Android and .NET/C# (free ebook)

    • John Wiley & Sons (Published under the Wrox Brand)
    • February 22, 2013

    Last week Xamarin announced a new version of MonoDevelop called Xamarin Studio. We've been big fans of Xamarin and Miguel de Icaza's work all the way back to the inception of the Mono project so we're especially amped to see Xamarin release a Free Starter Xamarin Studio to bring this great mobile development tool to an even bigger programmer audience.

    Professional Android Programming with Mono for Android and .NET/C#In the spirit of free then, we're happy to share this free starter from Wrox's Professional Android Programming with Mono for Android and .NET/C#. Download this free starter is a PDF with chapters 1-4 of the book to get you started developing Android apps in the Xamarin tools. While the new Xamarin tools have changed a bit, we do still think these chapters will be useful if you're new to using Mono and Xamarin for Android development. Here's the outline of what's covered in these free Mono for Android chapters. We hope if you find this useful, you'll come back and buy the complete book from Wrox here at Wrox.com or at your favorite book retailer.
    Chapter 1: Introduction to Android, Mobile Devices, and the Marketplace

    Product Comparison
    Mobile Development
    Android
    Cross-Platform Alternatives
    Summary

    Chapter 2: Introduction to Mono for Android

    Before You Begin Developing
    Visual Studio Development with Mono for Android
    Mono for Android Development with MonoDevelop
    Summary

    Chapter 3: Understanding Android/Mono for Android Applications

    What Is an Android Application?
    Binding the Components: The Android Manifest
    Summary

    Chapter 4: Planning and Building Your Application's User Interface

    Guidelines for a Successful Mobile UI
    Building an Android UI
    Choosing a Control Layout
    Designing Your User Interface Controls
    Controlling Your Menus
    Resolution-Independent UI
    Constructing a User Interface: A Phone and Tablet Example
    Summary

  • Juice Up Your Android App's User Interface

    • Visual Studio Magazine
    • March 19, 2013

    You never get a second chance to make a first impression. For an application, that first impression is how your user will interact with your application. Users want to get into an application, do some work and then get out (unless your application is a game). Users have other things to do in their lives. This article will examine how to provide some simple enhancements to your application's UI, which will allow users to get things done quicker.

  • Introduction to Xamarin.iOS for Visual Studio

    • Visual Studio Magazine
    • April 19, 2013

    Developers working with Xamarin MonoTouch have been stuck with developing on a Macintosh and working with MonoDevelop. This hasn't been a bad thing. The Apple iOS SDK only runs on the Mac, so this requirement hasn't been a major limiting factor in iOS development.

    Unfortunately, .NET and C# developers are used to using Visual Studio. Microsoft has spent a lot of time, effort and money to make Visual Studio the premier software development tool in existence. Xamarin Inc. has heard from those developers who want to integrate Visual Studio with iOS development. On Feb. 20, Xamarin introduced Xamarin.iOS for Visual Studio. This plug-in allows developers using Visual Studio to write iPhone and iPad applications for the iPhone using the Microsoft .NET Framework and C#.

  • Mobile Web Development with HTML5 and jQuery Mobile

    • Penton Media
    • April 23, 2013

    Mobile development is a hot item. Customers are buying iPhones, iPads, Android devices, and many other mobile computing devices at an ever increasing record pace. Devices based on iOS and Android are nearly 80 percent of the marketplace. RIM continues to be dominant in the business area across the world. Nokia's growth with Windows Phone will grow on a worldwide basis.

    At the same time, clearly web development is a tremendous driver of applications, both on the public Internet and on private networks. How can developers target these various mobile platforms with web technologies? Developers can write web applications that take advantage of each mobile platform, but that is a lot of work.

    Into this space, the jQuery Mobile framework was developed. This eLearning series will provide an overview of mobile web development with jQuery Mobile, a detailed look at what the jQuery Mobile framework provides for us, how we can customize jQuery Mobile, and how we can use jQuery Mobile inside of ASP.NET.

  • Mapping with Apple iPhone/iPad & Google Android

    • Xamarin Evolve
    • April 17, 2013

    My talk on mapping & location with Xamarin's Xamarin.iOS (formerly MonoTouch) and Xamarin.Android (formerly Mono for Android).

  • Google Maps for iOS SDK

    • Visual Studio Magazine
    • June 13, 2013

    With the introduction of iOS 6 in September 2012, Apple Inc. removed the map system based on Google Maps and introduced its own map system for iPhone and iPad users. The introduction of Apple Maps, like any new technology, came with its own problems.

    In December 2012, Google released its Google Maps SDK for iOS. (Check the Google Maps SDK for iOS page for additional documentation as new features are deployed to the product.) Google Maps for iOS has a long, solid track record, given the use of its data in Android and many years of usage. The introduction of Google Maps for iOS has resulted in a measurable increase in the number of users who have updated their existing iPhones from iOS version 5 to iOS version 6. This article will look at using Google Maps for iOS using Xamarin.iOS.

  • Mapping and Location in Android with Xamarin.Android

    • Visual Studio Magazine
    • July 18, 2013

    Real Estate is all about location, location, location. Mobile is about maps, location and maps. Maps are an excellent mechanism to communicate information about locations. Maps are graphical, and you know that a picture is worth a thousand words. When users are mobile, presenting a user with a map provides him with easy-to-understand location information in a graphical format. In this article, I'll introduce the mapping and location APIs in Mono for Android.
    http://visualstudiomagazine.com/articles/2013/07/01/mapping-and-location-with-mono-for-android.aspx

  • Tech After Dark - Mobile Web Development

    • Penton Media
    • August 22, 2013

    n the busy world of development, you barely have time to learn something new because you’re so busy dealing with the technology you’ve already got. Wouldn’t it be great to take control of your learning? But when? Your days are already spoken for.

    Mobile development is a hot item. Customers are buying iPhones, iPads, Android devices, and many other mobile computing devices at an ever increasing record pace. Devices based on iOS and Android are nearly 80 percent of the marketplace. RIM continues to be dominant in the business area across the world. Nokia's growth with Windows Phone will grow on a worldwide basis.

    At the same time, clearly web development is a tremendous driver of applications, both on the public Internet and on private networks. How can developers target these various mobile platforms with web technologies? Developers can write web applications that take advantage of each mobile platform, but that is a lot of work.

    Into this space, the jQuery Mobile framework was developed. This eLearning series will provide an overview of mobile web development with jQuery Mobile, a detailed look at what the jQuery Mobile framework provides for us, how we can customize jQuery Mobile, and how we can use jQuery Mobile inside of ASP.NET.

  • HTML5 Video and History: Features Users Can Really See

    • MSDN Magazine / 1105 Media
    • August 22, 2013

    Who hasn’t started looking at the mobile Web and HTML5—features like the viewport, new HTML5 controls, geolocation and many others that are part of smartphones, tablets and advanced browsers? With these features, developers have started to provide users with fairly common, new input controls; jQuery Mobile features; location and mapping; and much more. In this article, I describe two features that you might not be familiar with: the <video> tag and Web history. The <video> tag lets you display video without the need for plug-ins like Flash. Web history allows users to use the Back button to return to the previous page in an AJAX application.

  • HTML5 Threading with Web Workers and Data Storage with IndexedDB

    • MSDN Magazine / 1105 Media
    • August 23, 2013

    In a previous article, I looked at the HTML5 <video> tag and History object, two of the many features that developers have started to implement to give users of their apps new input controls, jQuery Mobile features, location and mapping, and much more. In this article, I continue exploring HTML5 features with a look at Web Workers, which let you speed up your client-side applications, and Indexed DB, a client-side data storage mechanism that is the preferred storage approach going forward in HTML5. (Before Indexed DB—also known as the Indexed Database API—work was focused on a standard named WebSQL. That work was discontinued in the fall of 2010. IndexedDB is the result of follow-on work to create a standard for data storage in Web browsers.)

  • Build an iPhone/iPad User Interface with Xamarin.iOS

    • Visual Studio Magazine
    • September 13, 2013

    No matter your feelings toward Apple, there's no denying the marketplace likes the iPhone and iPad family of products. You can't ignore them, and because you're reading this column, I thought it would be interesting to look at the options you have for creating a UI with Xamarin.iOS. There are two options I'll look at in-depth:

    Using the XCode design surface integration with Xamarin Studio.
    Programmatically creating controls.

  • What's New in iOS7 And Xamarin - Webinar

    • LearnNowOnline, Inc.
    • October 9, 2013

    I covered the basics of what is new in iOS7 along with what is new in Xamarin's developer platform. Please take some time and view this webinar. The items that were covered include:

    What's new in iOS7.
    The XCode Design Surface.
    An example showing new iOS7 View Animations.
    What's new with Xamarin and async, await, and HttpClient.
    A demo of Razor Templating.
    The Xamarin.iOS Plugin for Visual Studio.

  • Async Operations in iPhone, iPad, and Android with Xamarin

    • Visual Studio Magazine / 1105 Media
    • October 10, 2013

    One of the great things about the .NET Framework is that Microsoft has worked long and hard to improve many features. Since the initial release of .NET 1.0, there has been support for threading via .NET threads as well as an application-level threadpool. This provided a great starting point when compared to Visual Basic 6 and classic ASP programming. The release of.NET 4 brought significant improvements in the area of threading, asynchronous operations and parallel operations. While the improvements made working with asynchronous operations easier, new problems were introduced, since many of these operations work based on callbacks. For example:

    How should a developer handle error checking?
    The program flow tends to be non-linear. Fixing bugs can be problematic.
    It is hard for a developer to get an understanding of what is happening within an application.
    The release of .NET 4.5 (and C# 5.0), in the fall of 2012, was a blockbuster update with regards to asynchronous operations and threads. Microsoft has added C# language keywords to take this non-linear callback-based program flow and turn it into a much more linear flow. Recently, Xamarin has updated Xamarin.Android and Xamarin.iOS to support async.

    This article will look at how Xamarin has implemented the .NET 4.5/C# 5 support into their Xamarin.iOS and Xamarin.Android productions. There are three general areas that I'll focus on:

    A general look at the asynchronous support in Xamarin's mobile products. This includes async, await, and the implications that this has for cross-platform code.
    The new HttpClient class that is provided in .NET 4.5/Mono 3.2.
    Xamarin's extensions for asynchronous operations for Android and iOS.

  • Take Advantage of iOS 7's New Features

    • 1105 Media
    • December 17, 2013

    On Sept. 18, Apple formally began distributing iOS 7 to users. Within one month, iOS 7 was running on 69.3 percent of iOS devices, according to app monitoring company Fiksu. On Sept. 20, Apple began selling the new iPhone 5s and 5c. While excitement surrounds the release of any new operating system, Apple creates additional excitement for developers, due to the rapid uptake of each new version of iOS.

    With iOS 7, Apple has provided a number of new features worth getting to know. Since this column is called "Cross-Platform C#," the question of the length of time it takes Xamarin to provide support for new features comes up frequently. There's good news on that front, because Xamarin has provided same-day support for the latest version of iOS. This article will take a look at some of these new iOS features.

  • Building Native User Interfaces is the Right Way to Build for Mobile

    • self
    • December 15, 2013

    This article discusses while building native applications using native user interfaces, native APIs, and integrating an application with a device is superior to a web based approach such as HTML5, mobile web, phone gap, and similar technologies.

  • The Right People Are More Important Than Technology - My god is stronger than your god

    • Self
  • How to Advance Your Software Development Career: Sharpen Your "Soft" Business Skills

    • Penton Media, Inc.
    • January 30, 2014

    Many developers get into technology careers because they like to write code. However, as you progress in your career, you'll probably find that at some point, you "hit the wall" and have reached the highest position you can solely as a coder. To advance in your career, you must expand your expertise to include more than just straight technology know-how and experience. You must understand the nature of business so that you can take actions in your career that directly profit the business and profit you as well.

  • Controls for Navigating Between Screens in iOS

    • 1105 Media
    • January 24, 2014

    Developers like to create simple examples. Typically, these examples are a screen of data and controls that users can work with. But rarely are real-world applications a single screen of data. iOS provides developers with several standard mechanisms to allow users to navigate between multiple screens of data. This article will examine two controls that developers can use to provide easy navigation for users: the UINavigationController and the UITabBarController.

  • The Business of Software Development

    • Penton Media
    • January 9, 2014

    Welcome to Dev Pro's article series about the business of software development and technology! The topic of this series, business development for software developers, covers some different ground than most of the other articles available at Dev Pro. Too many developers think in terms of bits, CPU cycles, and reads/writes to a disk drive. Rarely do developers and technologists think in terms of how an application feature impacts a company's bottom line, the importance of time to market, why marketing is important, the ramifications of contracts, and many other items. This series will help in explaining the importance of these elements of business development.

  • How to Market Your Software Business: A Guide for Developers

    • Penton Media
    • January 23, 2014

    We technologists are always looking for a better way to do things. We love the "best" solution. Technologists also tend to be skeptical of marketing pitches, which are geared more toward attracting customers rather than promoting a solution solely on its technical quality. In general, we technologists are wary of marketing. But in the real world, to get customers to notice your service, you need to offer more than the best solution. You also need the right marketing approach to promote your expertise.

  • iOS 7 and Xamarin: .NET and Visual Studio Plugins

    • Learn Now Online, LLC
    • January 20, 2014


    Course Description: With the new features from Xamarin, .NET developers have many things that they can work with. Xamarin has provided support for Visual Studio developers to write iPhone and iPad applications. Support for the asynchronous APIs in .NET 4.5, the .NET 4.5 HTTP client, improved gestures for an improved API to work with and other features as well.

  • iOS 7 And Xamarin: Introduction and Features

    • Learn Now Online, LLC
    • January 20, 2014


    Course Description: In this course we will look at a number of new features for iOS 7. These include the visual transition between views and a number of other new features. We’ll look at iBeacons and more options for background processes. iBeacons have the power to improve location management services by giving really fine control over location and the information at that location. The Background processing feature has been designed for the mobile environment and takes into account power management issues.

  • CodeCast with oAuth and Xamarin

    • CodeCast
    • February 26, 2014

    In episode 2 of CodeCast by STLTechTalk, we bring you Wally McClure!

    Wally took us for a nice walk down the technology memory lane talking about things like the Commodore 64 and how he got started with technology which led him to where he is now as a developer.

    Then after the interview, he jumped into a Xamarin demo using Visual Studio of an iOS and Android simulation.

  • Build a Cross-Platform, Mobile Golf App Using C# and Xamarin

    • MSDN Magazine (Microsoft Developer Network)
    • April 1, 2014

    One of the fun things about the return of golf season is participating in tournaments that feature events such as a longest drive contest. In these, a person’s first shot off a designated hole is measured against others in the tournament. The longest drive during the day is declared the winner. However, these contests typically don’t have centralized scoring. If you’re in the first group, you don’t know until after the event is over where your shots stand in relation to everyone else’s. Why not use a mobile phone to record the starting point and ending point of drives and store the information in a cloud-hosted database?

    The options for building such an app are many, which can be confusing. In this article, I’ll walk through how I built such an app using the back-end options in Windows Azure and how I handled various issues. I’ll show the code for writing an app for Windows Phone as well as iOS using Xamarin.

    Several features were required. The app needed to run across mobile devices and multiple device OSes. It had to be a native app that looked just like all of the others on a device. The back-end server had to be always available, with minimal hassle to the developer (me). The cloud services had to provide as much help as possible in the area of cross-platform development. The back-end database needed to provide some amount of geolocation functionality.

  • Cross Platform with Portable Class Libraries and ASP .NET Razor Templating

    • Learn Now Online
    • April 28, 2014

    In this course we’ll cover cross platform mobile development using Xamarin. First we’ll cover Portable class libraries (PCLs). PCLs are tools provide .NET developers a way to share code between platforms with one library. PCLs help developers reduce the time and costs of development and testing code. With a PCL project, one library can be used by multiple platforms. Then we’ll move onto Mobile web apps. Mobile web apps are a very popular mechanism to target mobile devices. Unfortunately, there are times that a mobile web app cannot access device specific features. Xamarin provides a mechanism to host an ASP.NET MVC Razor Web Template/Page within a native application. This provides the cross platform capabilities of the web while still allowing applications to access native features of device.

  • Cross Platform Data Access for iPhone, iPad, and Android

    • Learn Now Online
    • May 12, 2014

    Applications live on data. These applications can vary from an online social network service, to a company’s internal database, to simple data, and all points in between. This Course will focus on how to easily access data on the device, communicate back and forth with a web service, and then finally to a SQL server database.

  • Android Navigation Principles

    • Visual Studio Magazine / 1105 Media
    • June 27, 2014

    Navigation in mobile devices is an important consideration. If a user isn't able to navigate an app, he might quickly abandon it. Learn the navigation principles of Android to keep this from happening to you.

  • Be More Social: oAuth, Facebook, and Xamarin

    • 1105 Media
    • July 29, 2014

    It isn't breaking news that social networks are a big deal to your users. But what's the best way to add that functionality in the cross-platform development world? One of the best ways is through Xamarin, which provides a set of components that allows developers to concentrate on high-level programming and solving user problems. This article will look at some technologies available in Android -- as well as the iPhone -- to add social features to applications. It serves as a companion to my April article that covered oAuth, Twitter and the Linq to Twitter library.

  • Cross Platform Mobile With C# Whitepaper

    • Visual Studio Magazine
    • July 22, 2014

    As a Microsoft-centric developer, you have great tools in the Microsoft .NET Framework and C# language, but you’re faced with a challenge when it comes to building apps for the exploding world of mobile devices: Learning new languages and platforms can be incredibly time-consuming. Wouldn’t it be better to use the skills you already possess? In this paper from Visual Studio Magazine, you’ll learn how to use the interoperable technologies of Xamarin to do just that.

Wallace McClure's Education

Georgia Institute of Technology

Master of Science, Electrical Engineering

19901991

Georgia Institute of Technology

Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering

19871990

Wallace McClure's Additional Information

Interests:

Written nine books on programming in .NET. These books include Software Architecture, Databases (Sql Server, Oracle, DB/2, MySql), AJAX, .NET, iPhone Programming with MonoTouch, and Android Programming with Mono for Android. Microsoft MVP. ASP Insider. ASP.NET Podcast. On a personal level, I am interested in golf, exercise, coaching kids sports, and meeting people. ASP.NET AJAX with Google Maps: http://aspnetpodcast.com/CS11/blogs/asp.net_podcast/archive/2008/05/01/asp-net-podcast-110-integrating-asp-net-ajax-with-google-maps.aspx

Groups and Associations:

Microsoft MVP, ASPInsider, Author, INETA and MVP, Blogger

Honors and Awards:

Microsoft MVP 2004 - current.
ASPInsider 2003 - current.
Author of 10 books. Mobile development, AJAX, and software architectures/databases.
Speaker at VSLive!, DevConnections, Xamarin Evolve, devLink, CodeStock

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