Jerry Workman

Jerry Workman

Executive Vice President of Research & Engineering at Unity Scientific

Location
Greater New York City Area
Industry
Electrical/Electronic Manufacturing

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Jerry Workman's Overview

Current
Past
Education
Connections

500+ connections

Websites

Jerry Workman's Summary

Significant track record for successful commercial development of technologies: medical devices for diagnostic and therapeutic use; laboratory and process equipment as well as software algorithm development. Experienced in business and product development plans and execution for start-ups to large global corporations. Expertise in clinical research, safety, operations, and IP review and management functions

Specialties

Managing Technical Teams for R&D Projects, Clinical Studies, and Product Management for Innovation Fast Track; Managing Technical Support Groups; Managing IP and innovation programs; New Technology Integration into Commercial Products; Documentation: Clinical DOE, Safety; Management and drafting of FDA, ISO, IEC documentation.

Jerry Workman's Experience

Executive Vice President of Research & Engineering/Operations

Unity Scientific

Privately Held; 51-200 employees; Electrical/Electronic Manufacturing industry

March 2011Present (3 years 7 months)

Global leader and Manufacturer of Laboratory, Process, and Clinical Analytical Systems; Leader in NIR for multiple markets.

Certified Core Adjunct Professor, School of Health and Human Services

National University

Nonprofit; 1001-5000 employees; Higher Education industry

January 2011Present (3 years 9 months)

Graduate Biostatistics, Biomedical Statistics, and Clinical Virology

Sole Proprietorship; 1-10 employees; Biotechnology industry

March 2010Present (4 years 7 months)

Biotechnology Business Associates (BBA) is a new, dynamic research consulting company located in Orange County (OC), California. BBA is committed to developing unique technologies, data processing algorithms, and validation approaches to produce high quality products using a variety of technologies, including optical and mechanical devices. BBA features excellent support and analytical facilities, an international staff, and is strongly integrated with the external scientific community. Contact us for information at: www.bbaoc.com or info@bbaoc.com

Adjunct Professor, College of General Studies

Liberty University

Educational Institution; 5001-10,000 employees; Higher Education industry

June 2010August 2013 (3 years 3 months)

Biological Sciences

Vice President, Technology Research

Masimo Corporation

Public Company; 1001-5000 employees; MASI; Medical Devices industry

September 2009January 2010 (5 months)

Medical Device Industry

Director of Measurement Systems

Luminous Medical

Privately Held; 11-50 employees; Medical Devices industry

2007September 2009 (2 years)

Medical Device Company

Director of Research & Applications

Thermo Fisher Scientific

Public Company; 10,001+ employees; TMO; Research industry

20052007 (2 years)

Biotechnology and Commercial Instrumentation Company

Chief Technical Officer, Vice President of R&D

Argose Inc

20022005 (3 years)

Medical Device Company

Senior Research Fellow

Kimberly-Clark

Public Company; 10,001+ employees; KMB; Consumer Goods industry

19962002 (6 years)

Medical and Consumer Products Company

Principal Scientist

PerkinElmer

Public Company; 5001-10,000 employees; PKI; Biotechnology industry

19931996 (3 years)

High Technology Instrumentation Company

Director of Technical Support, Analytical Group

Perstorp AB

Privately Held; 1001-5000 employees; Chemicals industry

19891993 (4 years) Silver Springs, Maryland USA

NIR spectrometer and laboratory reference analysis technical support

Senior Scientist, Instruments

Hitachi

Public Company; 10,001+ employees; HIT; Electrical/Electronic Manufacturing industry

19871989 (2 years)

R&D and Technical Support of all Instrumentation

Jerry Workman's Skills & Expertise

  1. Biotechnology
  2. Life Sciences
  3. Medical Devices
  4. R&D
  5. FDA
  6. Diagnostics
  7. Statistics
  8. Data Analysis
  9. Research
  10. Product Development
  11. Clinical
  12. Lifesciences
  13. Clinical Research
  14. Spectroscopy
  15. Analytical Chemistry
  16. Hardware Diagnostics
  17. Technology Transfer
  18. Biomedical Engineering
  19. Technical Writing
  20. Quality Assurance
  21. Patents
  22. Validation
  23. Start-ups
  24. Product Management
  25. Chemistry
  26. Design of Experiments
  27. Molecular Biology
  28. Regulatory Affairs
  29. Commercialization
  30. Biochemistry
  31. Pharmaceutical Industry
  32. GLP
  33. Management
  34. Engineering
  35. Cross-functional Team Leadership
  36. Leadership
  37. Software Documentation
  38. GMP
  39. Chromatography
  40. Manufacturing
  41. Nanotechnology
  42. Materials Science
  43. Quality System
  44. ISO 13485
  45. Process Simulation
  46. Organic Chemistry
  47. UV/Vis
  48. Laboratory
  49. Science
  50. HPLC

View All (50) Skills View Fewer Skills

Jerry Workman's Publications

  • Application of spectra cross-correlation for Type II outliers screening during multivariate near-infrared spectroscopic analysis of whole blood

    • Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems
    • July 1, 2011
    Authors: Jerry Workman, David Abookasis*

    Abstract

    In this study, a simple screening algorithm was developed to prevent the occurrence of Type II errors for samples with high prediction error that are not detected as outliers. The method is used to determine “good” and “bad” spectra and to prevent a false negative condition where poorly predicted samples appear to be within the calibration space, yet have inordinately large residual or prediction errors. The detection and elimination of this type of sample, which is a true outlier but not easily detected, is extremely important in medical decisions, since such erroneous data can lead to considerable mistakes in clinical analysis and medical diagnosis. The algorithm is based on a cross-correlation comparison between samples spectra measured over the region of 4160–4880 cm− 1.

  • Direct measurements of blood glucose concentration in the presence of saccharide interferences using slope and bias orthogonal signal correction and Fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy

    • Journal of Biomedical Optics
    • February 1, 2011
    Authors: Jerry Workman, David Abookasis*

    Abstract

    Saccharide interferences such as Dextran, Galactose, etc. have a great potential to interfere with near infrared (NIR) glucose analysis since they have a similar spectroscopic fingerprint and are present physiologically at large relative concentrations. These can lead to grossly inappropriate interpretation of patient glucose levels and resultant treatment in critical care and hospital settings. This study describes a methodology to reduce this effect on glucose analysis using an NIR Fourier transform spectroscopy method combined with a multivariate calibration technique (PLS) using preprocessing by orthogonal signal correction (OSC). A mathematical approach based on the use of a single calibration based bias and slope correction was applied in addition to a standard OSC was investigated. This approach is combined with a factorial interferent calibration design to accommodate for interference effects. We named this approach as a slope and bias OSC (sbOSC).

  • Process Analytical Chemistry

    • Analytical Chemistry
    • June 15, 2011
    Authors: Jerry Workman, Barry K. Lavine, Ray W. Chrisman, Mel Koch

    Review of Key Developments in Process Analytical Chemistry from 2009 to 2011.

  • Practical Guide and Spectral Atlas for Interpretive Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, Second Edition

    • CRC Press - A Taylor & Francis Group
    • July 1, 2011
    Authors: Jerry Workman, Lois Weyer

    In this second edition of The Practical Guide and Spectral Atlas for Interpretive Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, we have endeavored to expand and update the chapters, and to produce the figures in a more dramatic spectral atlas format, i.e., in a 4 color 8 1/2 x 11-inch page size. The color and larger graphical presentation provides richer, more detailed spectra than the first edition. This revised Atlas also includes new research, editorials, supplements, and molecular structural formulas (Appendix 8), including updated references and information on NIR spectra.

  • U.S. Patent 8,008,088; SMMR (small molecule metabolite reporters) for use as in vivo glucose biosensors

    • U.S. Patent Office
    • August 30, 2011
    Authors: Jerry Workman, Bellott; Emile M., Bu; Dongsheng), Childs; James J., Lambert; Christopher, Nienaber; Hubert A.), Shi; Shirley

    Small Molecule Metabolite Reporters (SMMRs) for use as in vivo glucose biosensors, sensor compositions, and methods of use, are described. The SMMRs include boronic acid-containing xanthene, coumarin, carbostyril and phenalene-based small molecules which are used for monitoring glucose in vivo, advantageously on the skin.

  • U.S. Patent 8,029,765; SMMR (small molecule metabolite reporters) for use as in vivo glucose biosensors

    • U.S. Patent Office
    • October 4, 2011
    Authors: Jerry Workman, Bellott; Emile M., Bu; Dongsheng), Childs; James J., Lambert; Christopher, Nienaber; Hubert A.), Shi; Shirley

    Small Molecule Metabolite Reporters (SMMRs) for use as in vivo glucose biosensors, sensor compositions, and methods of use, are described. The SMMRs include boronic acid-containing xanthene, coumarin, carbostyril and phenalene-based small molecules which are used for monitoring glucose in vivo, advantageously on the skin.

  • Development of carboxylic acid search prefilters for spectral library matching

    • Microchemical Journal
    • January 5, 2012
    Authors: Jerry Workman, Barry K. Lavine, Kadambari Nuguru, Nikhil Mirjankar

    Pattern recognition methods have been used to develop search prefilters for infrared (IR) library searching. A two step procedure has been employed. First, the wavelet packet tree is used to decompose each spectrum into wavelet coefficients that represent both the high and low frequency components of the signal. Second, a genetic algorithm for pattern recognition analysis is used to identify wavelet coefficients characteristic of functional group. Even in challenging trials involving carboxylic acids, compounds that possess both carbonyl and hydroxyl functionalities can be readily differentiated from carboxylic acids. The proposed search prefilters allow for the use of more sophisticated and correspondingly more time-consuming algorithms in IR spectral library matching because the size of the library can be culled down for a specific match using information from the search prefilter about the presence or absence of specific functional groups in the unknown.

  • Chemometrics in Spectroscopy Series

    • Spectroscopy
    • March 14, 2012

    This is a link to the multipart series on Chemometrics in Spectroscopy published in Spectroscopy Magazine

  • U.S. Patent 8,140,500; Spectral measurement with assisted data analysis

    • U.S. Patent Office
    • March 20, 2012
    Authors: Jerry Workman, Stephen Lowry, Simon Nunn, Kathy Schulting

    A system is provided wherein spectrometer measurements, and/or measurements from other analytical instruments, are transmitted to a processing station which determines the component substances of the sample(s) subjected to the measurements. The names of the component substances are then inserted into database search queries related to matters such as handling precautions, causes/sources of the substances, remedies and neutralizing agents for the substances, regulations related to the substances, etc. The results of the search queries are then provided to the personnel who made the measurements, preferably wirelessly and almost immediately after the measurements were made. The system therefore provides nearly immediate guidance as to what substances are present and how to handle them, which can be useful for inexperienced personnel in hazardous response, contraband detection, industrial process control, and other situations.

  • Workman Book Series

    • May 1, 2012
    Authors: Jerry Workman

    Locate Books at Amazon

  • Algorithm development for automated outlier detection and background noise reduction during NIR spectroscopic data processing

    • Proc. SPIE 8137, 813703 (2011)
    • August 23, 2011
    Authors: Jerry Workman, David Abookasis

    This study describes a hybrid processing algorithm for use during calibration/validation of near-infrared spectroscopic signals based on a spectra cross-correlation and filtering process, combined with a partial-least square regression (PLS) analysis. In the first step of the algorithm, exceptional signals (outliers) are detected and remove based on spectra correlation criteria we have developed. Then, signal filtering based on direct orthogonal signal correction (DOSC) was applied, before being used in the PLS model, to filter out background variance. After outlier screening and DOSC treatment, a PLS calibration model matrix is formed. Once this matrix has been built, it is used to predict the concentration of the unknown samples. Common statistics such as standard error of cross-validation, mean relative error, coefficient of determination, etc. were computed to assess the fitting ability of the algorithm Algorithm performance was tested on several hundred blood samples prepared at different hematocrit and glucose levels using blood materials from thirteen healthy human volunteers. During measurements, these samples were subjected to variations in temperature, flow rate, and sample pathlength. Experimental results highlight the potential, applicability, and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in terms of low error of prediction, high sensitivity and specificity, and low false negative (Type II error) samples.

  • An Efficient Method for Signal Improvement in Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Measurements during Calibration and Validation Processes

    • Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems
    • June 7, 2012
    Authors: Jerry Workman, David Abookasis

    Standard spectroscopic practice involves the measurements of replicate spectra (designated as s) for each sample where these replicates are co-added in order to reduce random noise by a factor of the square root of s. However, when systematic or structured noise are present, due to instrument or sample upset conditions, or subject motion, this practice tends to degrade and distort spectral bands. When co-adding multiple replicate measurements for single samples, such distortion tends to cause biased calibration coefficients and larger prediction errors, resulting in loss of analytical accuracy. In this work a simple automated procedure is presented aimed to circumvent the above mentioned concern. Multiple replicate spectra of a sample are correlated with the median of the entire set of replicate spectra and then ranked by similarity based on the correlation of each spectrum to this ‘reference’ median spectrum. A tunable ‘binning size’ parameter is chosen by dividing the set of ranked, correlated replicate spectra into sub-spectral groups. The highest correlation spectra then co-added with the median to yield what is termed here as a single ‘ideal’ spectrum. These steps are repeated for each set of sample measurements and performed for both calibration and validation data sets before modeling or prediction. Results from experiments show a substantial decrease in both standard errors of prediction and bias in comparison to the classical replicate spectra co-averaging approach highlight the effectiveness of the proposed method. The method is referred to as Ideal Spectrum Adaptive Filtering (ISAF).

  • NIR Publications Series

    • IMPublications
    • June 17, 2012
    Authors: Jerry Workman

    NIR Reviews and Publications from IMPublications

  • Process Analytical Chemistry and Chemometrics Reviews

    • Analytical Chemistry, American Chemical Society (ACS)
    • June 19, 2012
    Authors: Jerry Workman, et al.

    Links to series of reviews from Analytical Chemistry journal - Note only the Process Analytical Chemistry and Chemometrics Review Citations

  • Applied Spectroscopy Reviews Papers

    • Applied Spectroscopy Reviews, Taylor & Francis Publishers
    • July 13, 2012
    Authors: Jerry Workman, et al.

    Link to Applied Spectroscopy Review Series

  • Pattern Recognition Assisted Infrared Library Searching

    • Applied Spectroscopy
    • August 1, 2012
    Authors: Jerry Workman, Barry K. Lavine, Kadambari Nuguru, Nikhil Mirjankar

    Pattern recognition methods have been used to develop search prefilters for infrared (IR) library searching. A two-step procedure has been employed. First, the wavelet packet tree is used to decompose each spectrum into wavelet coefficients that represent both the high and low frequency components of the signal. Second, a genetic algorithm for pattern recognition analysis is used to identify wavelet coefficients characteristic of functional group. Even in challenging trials involving carboxylic acids, compounds that possess both carbonyl and hydroxyl functionalities can be readily differentiated from carboxylic acids. The proposed search prefilters allow for the use of more sophisticated and correspondingly more time-consuming algorithms in IR spectral library matching because the size of the library can be culled down for a specific match using information from the search prefilter about the presence or absence of specific functional groups in the unknown.

  • Chemometrics

    • Analytical Chemistry
    • November 9, 2012
    Authors: Jerry Workman, Barry Lavine

    This Chemometrics review, the nineteenth of this series, and the seventeenth with the title of “Chemometrics,” covers the most significant developments in the field from December 2009 through October 2012.

  • U.S. Patent 8,466,286; SMMR (small molecule metabolite reporters) for use as in vivo glucose biosensors

    • U. S. Patent Office
    • June 18, 2013
    Authors: Jerry Workman, Bellott; Emile M., Bu; Dongsheng, Childs; James J., Lambert; Christopher, Nienaber; Hubert A., Shi; Shirley J.

    Small Molecule Metabolite Reporters (SMMRs) for use as in vivo glucose biosensors, sensor compositions, and methods of use, are described. The SMMRs include boronic acid-containing xanthene, coumarin, carbostyril and phenalene-based small molecules which are used for monitoring glucose in vivo, advantageously on the skin.

  • U.S. Patent 8,509,867; Non-invasive measurement of analytes

    • U.S. Patent Office
    • August 13, 2013
    Authors: Jerry Workman, Chris Lambert, Robert Coleman

    This invention provides devices, compositions and methods for determining the concentration of one or more metabolites or analytes in a biological sample, including cells, tissues, organs, organisms, and biological fluids. In particular, this invention provides materials, apparatuses, and methods for several non-invasive techniques for the determination of in vivo blood glucose concentration levels based upon the in vivo measurement of one or more biologically active molecules found in skin.

  • Calibration Transfer

    • Spectroscopy (Advanstar Publishers)
    • February 1, 2013

    The results we found from our previous subseries about classical least squares analysis provides the mechanism for understanding when and why calibration transfer can be done easily or when it will be difficult. Those results also provide a basis for a modified understanding of what calibration transfer means and how we can tell whether or not such a transfer can be performed, for any given analysis.

  • Calibration Transfer, Part II: The Instrumentation Aspects

    • Spectroscopy (Advanstar Publishers)
    • May 1, 2013

    This is a continuation from our previous column on the subject of multivariate calibration transfer (or calibration transfer) for spectroscopy. As we noted in part I, calibration transfer is a series of approaches or techniques used to attempt to apply a single spectral database, and the calibration model developed using that database, to two or more instruments. Here in part II, we survey the issues related to instrument measurement differences associated with the calibration transfer problem in its current state of the art.

  • Calibration Transfer, Part III: The Mathematical Aspects

    • Spectroscopy (Advanstar Publishers)
    • June 1, 2013

    This column is a continuation from our previous two columns on the subject of multivariate calibration transfer (or calibration transfer) for spectroscopy. As we noted in the previous columns, calibration transfer is a series of approaches or techniques used to attempt to apply a single spectral database, and the calibration model developed using that database, to two or more instruments. Those instruments may be of like or different technical design. In this installment, we review the mathematical approaches and issues related to the calibration transfer process.

  • Calibration Transfer, Part IV: Measuring the Agreement Between Instruments Following Calibration Transfer

    • Spectroscopy (Advanstar Publishers)
    • October 1, 2013

    This is our 100th "Chemometrics in Spectroscopy" column, and when including "Statistics in Spectroscopy," there are now a total of 138 columns. We began in 1986 and have been working since that time to cover in-depth discussions of both basic and difficult subjects. In this newest series, we have been discussing the subject of multivariate calibration transfer (or calibration transfer) and the determination of acceptable error for spectroscopy. We have covered the basic spectroscopy theory of spectroscopic measurement in reflection, discussed the concepts of measuring and understanding instrument differences, and provided an overview of the mathematics used for transferring calibrations and testing transfer efficacy. In this installment, we discuss the statistical methods used for evaluating the agreement between two or more instruments (or methods) for reported analytical results. The emphasis is on acceptable analytical accuracy and confidence levels using two standard approaches: standard uncertainty or relative standard uncertainty, and Bland-Altman "limits of agreement."

  • Units of Measure in Spectroscopy, Part I: It's the Volume, Folks!

    • Spectroscopy
    • February 14, 2014

    Quantitative spectroscopy measures a concentration value as scaled volume fraction only. This is described as Mass/Volume or Moles/Volume. From quantitative analysis the data show that different units of measurement have different relationships to the spectral values, for reasons having nothing to do with the spectroscopy. This finding disproves the unstated, but near-universal, assumption that different measures of concentration are equivalent except, perhaps, for a constant scaling factor.

  • Calibration Transfer, Part V: The Mathematics of Wavelength Standards Used for Spectroscopy

    • Spectroscopy
    • June 1, 2014

    How does one compute the mathematical certainty of wavelength standards used for calibrating instrumentation used for molecular spectroscopy measurements? This question becomes of major importance when the technique used for measurement requires the collection of large databases for use in qualitative searches or quantitative multivariate analysis. Wavelength drift over time within a single instrument or wavelength differences between instruments create errors and variation in the accuracy of measurements using databases collected with different wavelength registrations. The loss of integrity over the wavelength axis of data collected over time is a significant problem in large database creation and usage. So, what are the techniques and mathematics used to compute uncertainty, and the optimum methods for maintaining wavelength accuracy within instrumentation over time, when considering measurement condition changes?

Jerry Workman's Education

Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Sloan School of Management

Executive Certificate, Strategy and Innovation

20052009

See http://mitsloan.mit.edu/execed/

Columbia University - Columbia Business School

Columbia Senior Executive Program (2004); Graduate Certificates: CIBE (2006), COED (2004), Business Leadership

20002006

see http://www.columbia.edu/cu/news/05/03/jerryWorkman.html

Activities and Societies: Alumni Advisory Board - CBS Executive Education 2005-2007

Columbia Pacific University

PhD, Biological Chemistry

Activities and Societies: High commendation for thesis work on bioanalytical methods of natural products; elected to Sigma Xi

Saint Mary's University of Minnesota

MA, Biological Sciences - Genetics

Activities and Societies: Research work on use of spectroscopy for protein analysis; Graduated with Distinction, NSF grants (2), National Scholastic Honor Society (Delta Epsilon Sigma); Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities, Faculty: Instructor

Saint Mary's University of Minnesota

BA, Natural Sciences (Cum Laude)

Activities and Societies: Honors Thesis and Graduate; Dean's List; Service Fraternity (Alpha Phi Omega); College Athlete (Co-Captain); University Staff and Instructor

Jerry Workman's Additional Information

Websites:
Interests:

Over 475 Technical Publications; 17 books; 32 invention disclosures; 17 issued U.S. and International Patents; Many successful commercial instrument and software development projects and products completed.

Groups and Associations:

Fellow, Royal Society of Chemistry; Fellow, ASTM International; Fellow, American Institute of Chemists; American Chemical Society; Sigma Xi; Chair, ASTM International Main Committee E13 on Molecular Spectroscopy and Separation Sciences; President, Council for Near Infrared Spectroscopy

Honors and Awards:

Coblentz Society Williams-Wright Award 2009
US Dept of Commerce Commendation (NRC-NIST) 2007
ASTM E13 Awards:2000 (Chemometrics), 2000 (FT-NIR), 2005 (Leadership)
Columbia Business School - Alumni Advisory Board (Exec. Ed.) 2005-2007
National Tour Speaker – Society for Applied Spectroscopy, 2005-2006
Chartered Scientist, Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) 2004
Executive Editor, Spectroscopy Letters, 1999-2003
Eastern Analytical Symposium Award in NIR 2002
ASTM International Award of Merit 2002
IBC Scientist of the Year 2002
US FDA Visiting Professor
Fellow, ASTM International
Fellow, RSC
Fellow, American Institute of Chemists
Chartered Chemist, RSC
Chair, Center for Process Analytical Chemistry (CPAC) IAB
Chair, ASTM E13 Main Committee (3 terms)
President, Council for NIR Spectroscopy
Perstorp AB Technical Award
Member, Sigma Xi
National Science Foundation Grants (2)
Shapira Scholar (American Heart Association)
Marquis Who's Who in America; World; and Science and Engineering

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