LinkedInDavid Lieb

David Lieb

Product at Google; fmr founder/CEO of Bump

Location
San Francisco Bay Area
Industry
Wireless
Current
  1. Google
Previous
  1. Origami Labs,
  2. Bump Technologies, Inc.,
  3. Texas Instruments
Education
  1. The University of Chicago Booth School of Business
Recommendations1 person has recommended David
Websites
500+connections

Join LinkedIn & access David's full profile

Join LinkedIn & access David's full profile. It's free!

As a LinkedIn member, you'll join 300 million other professionals who are sharing connections, ideas, and opportunities.

  • See who you know in common
  • Get introduced
  • Contact David directly
500+connections
Google

Google

Product

– Present

View full profile

Background

Summary

I'm a product- and engineering-focused entrepreneur who likes to solve real problems for normal people with simple products.

My focus: Make the world a better place by building products people want.

Some of my thoughts on mobile product design:
http://techcrunch.com/2013/04/20/cognitive-overhead/
http://techcrunch.com/2012/07/30/irreducible/

Follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/dflieb
Subscribe to my updates at http://www.facebook.com/david.lieb

Experience

Product

Google
– Present (1 year 2 months)Mountain View, CA

Google acquired Bump in September 2013.

Member, Board of Directors

Origami Labs
(11 months)Mountain View, CA

Origami was acquired by eFamily in November 2013. The Origami team was acquired by Nest, and subsequently Nest was acquired by Google.

Origami (formerly Everyme) is a YC-funded private social networking startup. Origami has created two products: Everyme, a private mobile social networking app; and Origami, a private social network for families.

Co-founder and CEO

Bump Technologies, Inc.
(5 years)

Bump was acquired by Google in September 2013.

Helping more than 150 million people interact in the real world:

Bump
http://bu.mp
Share photos, files, contacts, and more between mobile devices and between phones and computers by just bumping.

Flock
http://theflockapp.com
Flock knows which family and friends you are with when photos are taken and brings everyone's photos into a single shared album. Flock is one of the first "inference-based" apps that require zero user intent post-install.

Our design philosophy:
http://techcrunch.com/2012/07/30/irreducible/
http://techcrunch.com/2013/04/20/cognitive-overhead/

Bump was funded by Y Combinator, SV Angel (Ron Conway), Sequoia, and Andreessen-Horowitz (Marc Andreessen).

Technology Strategist

Texas Instruments
(10 months)

Explored new opportunities for TI's MEMS technologies in a cross-disciplinary skunkworks team of 10. Built prototypes for new products including:

- 3D imaging via structured light
- Motion-adaptive handheld projectors
- Heads-up displays

Algorithm Engineer

Texas Instruments
(6 years 6 months)

I helped make DLP display systems brighter, sharper, more colorful, and thinner. Matlab was my best friend. I built prototypes out of cardboard over Christmas break, filed more than a dozen patent applications, and killed it on the TI softball team.

My major projects included:
- algorithms for solid state illumination systems
- laser TVs
- cell phone projectors

Full-time at TI from June 2005 through August 2008 following 4 summer internships in various groups at TI, including two summers in the Kilby Fab advanced R&D center.

Education

The University of Chicago Booth School of Business

1/2 MBA, Entrepreneurship, General Management

I finished half my MBA before leaving school to work on Bump.

Stanford University

MSEE, Machine Learning and Computer Vision

I helped make robots see while working in Sebastian Thrun's Artificial Intelligence Lab. I also did a stint in Marc Levoy's Graphics Lab building algorithms for indoor mapping. My focus was novel *practical* applications of computer vision and machine learning techniques to make real things happen for real people (and robots).

Princeton University

BSEE, Electrical Engineering

Walk-on left-handed pitcher to the Varsity baseball team.

Patents

Adaptive pulse-width modulated sequences for sequential color display systems

United States 8,305,387
Issued November 6, 2012

We call this "Duty Cycle On-The-Fly". Make projectors and TVs brighter by dynamically adjusting the colors and timing in real time based on scene content. So if your scene is mostly red, don't waste time and energy displaying lots of blue and green light.

Inventors:

High dynamic range display systems(Link)

United States 8542408
Issued September 24, 2013

Cascade two spatial light modulators to achieve an amazing HDR display.

Inventors:

System and method for image-based color sequence reallocation

United States 8,253,755
Issued August 28, 2012

More math. If your scene is mostly red, why waste time and energy displaying green and blue?

Inventors:

Pulse width modulation algorithm

United States 7,956,878
Issued June 7, 2011

We call this "Off State Light Recycling". When a pixel in the image you are displaying is dark, you are wasting all the light incident on that pixel. Here's how you recycle that light back into the bright pixels and make your display brighter.

Inventors:

Pulse width modulation algorithm

United States 7,928,999
Issued April 19, 2011

Don't waste light on dark pixels. Recycle it back into the bright pixels. Here's the math to do that and make your image look good.

Inventors:

Pulse width modulation algorithm

United States 7,876,340
Issued January 25, 2011

More math around algorithms for recycling light from dark pixels to bright pixels.

Inventors:

Publications

Reverse optical flow for self-supervised adaptive autonomous robot navigation(Link)

International Journal on Computer Vision (IJCV)
January 2007

A robot drives through a forest. It eventually reaches terrain it can't navigate (a tree, a swamp). Local sensors tell it that (ex: it hits a tree). Then it looks backwards in time to see what that tree looked like when it was far far away. Then it teaches itself to remember what that tree looked like and avoid it in the future. This is what nerds call Self-supervised Learning; our twist is to use optical flow techniques to go backwards in time.

A. Lookingbill, J. Rogers, J. Curry, D. Lieb, and S. Thrun. Reverse optical flow for self-supervised adaptive autonomous robot navigation. International Journal on Computer Vision (IJCV), 2007.

Learning activity-based ground models from a moving helicopter platform(Link)

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Barcelona, Spain
May 2005

A helicopter flies above a scene on the ground. It's moving all over the place, so is the stuff on the ground. Using really smart algorithms, the helicopter can figure out what is moving on the ground using just a simple video camera. Then, after watching the ground for a little while, it can learn what types of things typically happen on the ground below it -- where people walk, when to expect busses, whether something out of the ordinary is occurring.

A. Lookingbill, D. Lieb, D. Stavens, and S. Thrun. Learning activity-based ground models from a moving helicopter platform. In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Barcelona, Spain, 2005.

Projects

Introducing Flock - A New Way to Share Photos(Link)

You and your friends love to take photos together,
but they always end up on different phones.

Flock finds the photos that you've taken together
and makes it easy for you to share them with each
other. So there's no more forgetting to share photos.

Producer, Director, Writer, Editor

Shot on RED Epic by Dale Tibor
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OADl43WSXvM

Music by Mira Music
http://miramusic.biz/

VFX by Aaron Bartlett http://www.linkedin.com/pub/aaron-bartlett/a/44/a18

Color Grading by Creative Rebellion
http://www.creativerebellion.ca/

Team members:

View David's full profile to...

  • See who you know in common
  • Get introduced
  • Contact David directly

Not the David Lieb you're looking for? View more

Insights


People Also Viewed


LinkedIn member directory:

  1. a
  2. b
  3. c
  4. d
  5. e
  6. f
  7. g
  8. h
  9. i
  10. j
  11. k
  12. l
  13. m
  14. n
  15. o
  16. p
  17. q
  18. r
  19. s
  20. t
  21. u
  22. v
  23. w
  24. x
  25. y
  26. z
  27. more