Offshore Construction

Offshore Construction

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About the Offshore Construction Group

The objective of this group is to create a network for operational personnel, practicing engineers and students, where we can discuss technology, procedures and innovation... more »
The objective of this group is to create a network for operational personnel, practicing engineers and students, where we can discuss technology, procedures and innovation in the Marine and Offshore construction industry.

Construction in the offshore environment is a difficult and dangerous activity. To minimize the risks and costs of constructing platforms offshore, various installation methods have been developed:
-One method is to fully construct the offshore facility inshore, and tow the installation to site floating on its own buoyancy. Bottom founded structure are then lowered to the seabed by ballasting, whilst floating structures are held in position with mooring systems.

-A second method is making the construction modular, with modules being constructed onshore followed by transportation using barge(s) or Heavy Transport Vessel(s) and then lifting them into place using a crane vessel. A number of large crane vessels were built in the 1970s which allow installation of modules weighing up to 14,000mt.

-A third method is to fabricate a production topsides onshore, transport it using a barge(s) or Heavy Transport Vessel(s) followed by installation using the “Float-over” method. The largest module installed until now is the PA-B Sakhalin platform with an estimated weight of 32,000mt. However, bigger modules are already being designed with weights ranging up to 50,000mt.

Development of management, technology and equipment like new generation heavy-lift vessels/barges, pipe-lay vessels/barges, support and transport vessels, remote sensing devices, Remote-Operating Vehicles, computerized aids and underwater technology are steadily improving safety, efficiency and economical execution of projects, in more unstable soils and under deteriorating environmental conditions as the industry is moving into harsher environments in search of “cheap” energy. « less

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About this Group

  • Created: May 25, 2009
  • Type: Professional Group
  • Members: 79,359
  • Subgroups: 16
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