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Neville

Going for gold - Should responsible governments raise the bar on sponsorship of the Olympic Games and other sporting events by food and beverage companies? Manager's Choice

Wordsmith, journalist, consultant

Read full article from Communications Law on http://bit.ly/LZnVFI

  • Comment (5)
  • July 6, 2012
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  • Neville R.

    Neville

    Neville R.

    Wordsmith, journalist, consultant

    Nothing complex here. The simple answer to the question is yes. There's no need to offer carte blanche to junk food producers to promote their brands because a handful of athletes assume they can achieve a minor (and very temporary) performance boost from a sugary drink. The issue is not about high performing athletes - it is reducing market exposure, particularly for children, where false associations with sport are merely cynical marketing exercises actually aimed at spectators rather than athletes.

  • Chelsea F.

    Chelsea

    Chelsea F.

    Affordable Public Relations, VP Business Development at PR You www.pr-you.com

    I do agree with you Neville, I don't there is a shortage of sponsorship dollars?? It seems as one of the truly physically inspiring and globally unifying events in this world couldn't a stand be made? This is a platform where we as the human race can try to redirect the path of poor nutrition. This is the tough challange though isn't it. What we seem to battle, health vs. profits. It will take many voices - share your vital information one and all whenever you can.

  • Neville R.

    Neville

    Neville R.

    Wordsmith, journalist, consultant

    The TOPs partners essentially bankroll the IOC so that its VIP committee and the favoured few can be guaranteed free seats, travel and hotels - and it seems exclusive traffic lanes for their limousines. These sponsors contribute very little on a percentage basis to the actual £11 billion cost of the Olympics, and their contributions are often evaluated 'in kind' rather than actual dollars. The long term exclusive deals prevent any 'healthy' supplier getting a look in anyway. An example of the way in which the Olympics have been hijacked as a pure marketing platform is the torch relay - not an Olympic tradition but instituted incidentally by Goebbels at Hitler's 1936 Olympics. It is a travesty, effectively enabling Coca-Cola to plaster its banners and marketing materials liberally in every town and village the torch passes through. Similarly Coca Cola selected torch bearers, flying in selected US candidates to carry it in the UK.

  • Susanne L.

    Susanne

    Susanne L.

    Director at European Heart Network

    Intersting analysis. To which extent does the sponsorship by Cocal Cola and Mconald's "violate" the EU pledge?

  • Neville R.

    Neville

    Neville R.

    Wordsmith, journalist, consultant

    The exposure is ubiquitous so not specifically marketing to under 12s or where children form the majority of the audience. But if the pledge was ever meant to reflect good intentions, the exclusive marketing of Coca-Cola and McDonald's at the Olympics clearly exposes children and leaves parents with little option - if they are within the Olympic sites, but externally promotes that false association of the brands with sport. Fortunately there is quite a broad-based backlash, rather late in the day, so people are waking up finally to the conflict of interests.

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