ADVANCE for NPs & PAs

ADVANCE for NPs & PAs

6,622 members
  • Join

    When you join a group, other members will be able to see your profile and message you. The group logo will be visible on your profile unless you change that setting.

  • Information and settings

Have something to say? Join LinkedIn for free to participate in the conversation. When you join, you can comment and post your own discussions.

Hollie

Does anyone Rooney their own patients ? As in calling them from the waiting room, take vitals, etc?

Np at Springfield Clinic

  • Comment (18)
  • March 26, 2012
  • Close viewer

Comments

  • Lynn

    Lynn O.

    DNP at Medicor Associates

    Am in a solo practice and do not typically room patients, but did so at my previous job on rare occasions when nurses got backed up.

  • Hollie Y.

    Hollie

    Hollie Y.

    Np at Springfield Clinic

    This isn't on rare occasions. I am expected to room my own patients

  • Susan D.

    Susan

    Susan D.

    Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner at Comtrea, Inc.

    In the community mental health center where I work, we weigh the pts. and bring them into the room. Our nurse does their met screens and we have a tech who takes care of the PAP and medication program paperwork.

  • Sara L.

    Sara

    Sara L.

    Nurse Practitioner at Alegent Creighton Health

    I have never heard or seen midlevels rooming their own patients. Every where I have worked the patients are roomed for me. You are the provider, not the nurse anymore. Nurses can be resistant to room your patients because you 'used to be one of them."

  • Annette B.

    Annette

    Annette B.

    Owner/Nurse Practitioner at Barnes Healthcare Inc

    Solo practice; so if Med Assistant or Nurse busy, yes I room to keep things flowing. I always recheck BP even if checked prior also.
    I work parttime in a busy specialty practice too and all NP/PA's room patients to decrease wait times but only if checked in, copays checked, and MA's are tied up.
    Now if they are chatting, they get interrupted to room the patient (not often).

  • M. David R.

    M. David

    M. David R.

    Nurse Practitioner for United Health Group

    I work in a retail clinic. In my company, some clinics that are busy have a medical assistant who enters the patient into the computer and puts the patient in the room. Then the nurse practitioner sees the patient. In my particular clinic, the patient flow is not that high so we do not have an assistant. I enter the patient into the EMR, take the vitals and room the patient. What I have noted is that the patient has an unbroken flow of contact with the nurse practitioner. I get a small view into some non-medical aspects of the patient such as economic and social status. I get an early start into the process of establishing a patient-clinician relationship.

    At first, I felt that rooming the patient was a clerical task but now I see it as a way to start the caring relationship right from the moment the patient enters the clinic. Most patients react very positively. One patient in particular said that she thought the process I use was very positive. She got to know the nurse practitioner and ask questions she would not usually ask.

    I wear many different hats as I work alone in this clinic. No I don't enjoy all of them equally but I really think that I have a unique situation that truly engages both the nurse practitioner and patient more closely.

  • Susan D.

    Susan

    Susan D.

    Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner at Comtrea, Inc.

    Even our psychiatrists weigh and bring patients into the rooms. We have office staff who are very good about getting them all checked in on the computer first.

Have something to say? Join LinkedIn for free to participate in the conversation. When you join, you can comment and post your own discussions.

Feedback